Target a demographic, and kill your brand
06/09/17 Branding & Marketing Strategy # , , , , , , ,

Target a demographic, and kill your brand

Originally published on Medium »

I was sitting in a restaurant in San Jose not too long ago having a deep discussion about marketing and brand strategies. (Yes, this is my life and you don’t have to think it’s awesome.) Throughout the chat the concept of a audience of focus (aka “target market”) would resurface. Close behind would be a string of information about said audience: age, sex, household income, etc.

After the third time this happened I interjected. I asked one of the folks to describe me to the other. I received blank stares, so I repeated. “Describe me, Joseph, to him as if he’s never met me. Start off with ‘I met this guy…’” Luckily the gentleman played along, and he started in, “I met this guy, Joseph. He’s rather smart, very intelligent, needs to shave, eloquent.”

Despite enjoying the compliments, I interjected again. I pointed out that not once had he mentioned that I was 30-something, Caucasian, Male, who makes X amount of dollars a year. Not once had he profiled demographic information about me. Yet, when many marketers or brand strategists profile their ideal patrons, they go right to the cold, hard demographics.

Demographics do little to help brands understand who their patrons truly are. “Millennials” isn’t a strategy. It’s a date range. Brands are built and proliferated by humans who have behaviors and aspirations. They want to portray their uniqueness and/or sense of belonging to the world. Therefore, brands provide elements much deeper than product and service. They provide a badge that helps identify a person. A brand gives them something to belong to while allowing them to adopt its attributes to create a perception to everyone around them.

Targeting people based on demographics is a waste of time and it will kill your brand. Identifying what your brand offers people by way of personality, attributes, and aspirations is how good brands get great. Your ideal patron isn’t Joseph who’s in his late-30’s, makes $X a year, etc. It’s Claire, who appreciates art and design so she shops at Crate & Barrel, drives a Land Rover, shops at Banana Republic because she likes simple, classic styles. She’s not into glitz and glamour. She’s well read and well traveled, finding Paris and Rome to be her favorite destinations.

Brands should look to relate and befriend their patrons by way of common interest and aspiration. When viewed from this angle, brands are no longer about selling turkey sandwiches, or vodka drinks. They’re something so much more.

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QSR, NRN & Campaign all publish new articles penned by Joseph
01/02/17 Branding & Marketing Strategy , In the press # , , , , , , , , , , ,

QSR, NRN & Campaign all publish new articles penned by Joseph

2017 has started off with a bang. Our work has been recognized by industry leading publications, GD USA and Print, and over the last couple weeks restaurant and advertising industry publications have shared our thinking. We’re constantly pushing the envelope here at Vigor, and part of doing that is having a finger on the pulse of people’s behaviors and how it affects the restaurant and beverage industries. Both industries are constantly fighting in a sea of sameness; vying for just a modicum of attention from key markets. Whether startup, or growing brands, understanding how your brand fits into their world is paramount for success. The three articles recently published cover some key issues facing restaurant and beverage brands, today. Have a read, and please share if you enjoy.

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Why Are Beer Brands Still Ignoring Women?

Campaign Magazine

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4 Ways Restaurants Can Win Over Generation Z

Nation’s Restaurant News & Restaurant Hospitality

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The New Rules for Naming Your Restaurant

QSR Magazine

 

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Erasing the Line: Why linear thinking is a fast-track to failing
29/04/16 Branding & Marketing Strategy # , , , , , , , ,

Erasing the Line: Why linear thinking is a fast-track to failing

When speaking with marketing professionals and restaurateurs conversations inevitably turn to new medias, or discussion of which medias are more successful than others. It’s easy to fall into these chats because the landscape of marketing tactics is an ever-changing world. Focusing on new medias or traditional tactics with new features isn’t wrong, but it does play into a large problem commonly found in the world of marketing restaurants and beverage brands: Linear thinking.

Often times marketing strategies take a media-first approach. Brands hear the latest and greatest thing, or a sales person sells them on a “magical silver bullet” media. They take the bait and run with implementing creative specific to said media and anxious await the results. The results rarely show up, and when they do they are almost never up to expectation or promise. Immediately, it’s the fault of the media because “it doesn’t work” and “not worth the money.”

The problem isn’t with media, it’s in the thinking. See, successful marketing isn’t a linear process. Each consumer has a different journey he or she takes to land with food on a fork or drink in hand. We’re a dynamic people who are affected differently by different things and influenced at different moments of our lives. With this kind of ebb and flow, it makes sense that no singular media outlet or tactic can claim to be the end-all, be-all. Nor can you expect it to delivery on such lofty promises.

Instead of attempting to draw a line between a media and the end result of butts in seats, heads in beds, and/or drinks in hands, you need to retrain your brain to think of marketing as weaving a net. Successful marketing is an interwoven, interlocking team of many touch points that work in unison to create many opportunities for conversion. Collectively it is powerful and successful, but only as powerful as what’s locking them all together: The idea.

It’s the idea, the passion, and the “why” that matters most for a brand. That idea must be communicated concisely and with passionate fervor across every single interlocking moment. The idea should dictate the media that delivers it and the results can vary. It’s not always leading directly to a conversion of sale. Sometimes it’s building awareness, or boosting word of mouth. Sometimes the idea is meant to alter understanding or clear misconceptions. Even these semi-intangible results have undeniable benefits to the brand’s bottomline. It’s just extremely difficult to measure because the customer is on a journey that’s far from a straight point A to point B line. Instead, it’s a multiple destination experience. And, yes, it should end in sales. The “end” is just farther away than you think most times.

My advice is to destroy the idea of a straight line, and start thinking about each destination as opportunities to bolster brand love while ushering them towards the ultimate, but not final, destination of conversion.

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